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New Energy Bars, bites, and chews from Outdoor Retailer

The South African racebar debuted in the US at Outdoor Retailer 2015
The South African racebar debuted in the US at Outdoor Retailer 2015

The Outdoor Retailer trade show is the place to go when a new food items wants to show itself off to the outdoor market. Foods at OR recently trended towards all natural, low sugar, and low grain/gluten free. While in the past, bars may have focused more on flavor, many bars at OR this season centered on balancing fats-carbs-proteins for optimal performance. Here are a few of the bars that stuck out:

Energy Bars Made with Crickets

Chapul bars come in fun flavors and are made of cricket protein
Chapul bars come in fun flavors and are made of cricket protein

Chapul energy bars feature a special ingredient that has 2x as much protein than beef, 15% more iron than spinach, and as much Vitamin B12 as salmon. The secret ingredient? Crickets. Chapul bars (as seen on the entrepreneurial reality TV Show Shark Tank) say that cricket protein is good for the environment and good for humans. 10 pounds of feed can yield 1 lb of beef (40% of which is edible) or 8 pounds of crickets (80% of which is edible). Crickets require less water to raise and emit fewer greenhouse gases than other livestock or even soy, corn, or rice.

An employee for Chapul holds up a container of cricket flour
An employee for Chapul holds up a container of cricket flour

Chapul’s crickets are ground into powdered protein that looks the same as whey or soy protein (both of which are common ingredients in bars). As a result, the bar looks and tastes the same as normal bars—you won’t find any legs or antennas in these bars. Chapul comes in four flavors: Aztec Bar (dark chocolate, coffee, and cayenne), Chaco Bar (Peanut Butter & Chocolate), the Thai Bar (Coconut, Ginger, and Lime), or my favorite and the newest bar, the Matcha bar (green tea, goji, and nori).

Four points bars are designed to maximize macronutrient balance
Four points bars are designed to maximize macronutrient balance

Four Points energy bars aims to create a balanced nutrition ratio with optimized glycemic load made of entirely raw ingredients. These fig and plum based bars are made in Colorado by outdoor athletes for outdoor athletes. The bar also have other superfoods like hemp seeds, flax seeds, and coconut, as well as most of the bars have whey protein isolate. Among the better tasting bars we tried, Four Points bar has a shelf life of 4 months and come in around 250 calories per 2.5 oz. Fourpoints bars come in Apple Cinnamon, Banana Bread, Mountain Mocha, Dark Chocolate Coconut, and PB&J.

racefood energy bars were a new energy bar from South Africa that debuted at this Summer OR. South Africa is well known for being home to a high number of endurance athletes and adventurers—and this bar was created with the feedback of South African athletes from a variety of outdoor activities and sports. The bar has a nougat base and uses simple and complex carbs to release energy without a spike. There are two varieties: Farbar (for endurance) and Fastbar (for instant energy). Racefood bars come in Cranberry & Almond and Cacao, Cashew, & Coconut.

Picky Bars are based in Bend, OR and pride themselves on being a balance between performance bars and real food bars. They have a 60% carb : 20% fat : 15% protein ratio and 200 calories per 45 g bar (note that some nutritionists believe that thru-hikers should have a ratio higher in fat than normal athletes). Featuring hip art, fun-product names (like Cookie Doughpness, Smooth Caffeinator, and Blueberry Boomdizzle), and sponsoring big name athletes, these trendy looking bars are available in run/bike stores and REIs and are going to blow up on the market soon. They feature a variety of flavors, my favorite being the All-In Almond.

Simple Squares: Sharing a booth with super supporter of the long trails, Salazon Sea Salt Dark Chocolate, Simple Squares showed its new line of 8 ingredient energy bars. Labeled USDA organic and gluten free, these bars are compact and pack in 230 calories in 1.6 oz. These squares had a great flavor and because they were free of the fruit base of many bars, seemed like they would be easy to digest on trail. What I liked the most about these squares were the funky flavors—including some sweet-and-savory bars: Chili pep, Honey Nut Sage, Rosemary, and Cinna-Clove.

Go Chia superfood bites: Totally different than anything else on the market, Go Chia created crispy bite-sized almost cracker-like snacks. The bites have a satisfying crunch that is quinoa and chia seed based and aren’t sweet, but mostly just feel very light and clean (despite having a very respectable 120 calories per oz). Of all the food from OR, they are the ones I wanted to eat the most while writing this article in the media room. GoChia bites are available in Chocolate Chunk or Cherry Chunk.

18 Rabbits: It seemed almost rare to have a traditional grain-based granola bar at the Outdoor Retailer show what with all the Paleo foods popping up everywhere. Nonetheless, 18 Rabbits had a small booth out in the Pavilions and honestly, had probably the tastiest bar I tried at the whole show, which was a granola bar Cherry Dark Chocolate and Almond bar. It was super coconutty and soft and sweet, although it has no wheat or refined sugars.

Skratch Although energy chew (aka gummies) aren’t quite energy bars, they can often operate a bit like one, and are usually great ways to deliver sugar to your system quickly before you bonk. Skratch made a name for themselves in the drink mix sector helping people prevent bonking by hydrating, and they are upping their game with Skratch Fruit Drops, vegan based jellies with real fruit powder. Unlike other similar items on the market, these drops do not have wax and are lightly coated in sugar. The flavor is certainly more subtle, which probably means easier to digest while exerting yourself. Considering how many gummies I tend to eat on trail, it’s surprising my stomach doesn’t have a big ball of wax inside. Available in raspberry and orange.

 

Setton Farms Pistachio bites: The pistachio is a totally under utilized nut in the energy bar industry. As a result, I found the flavor and texture on this bar to be different and refreshing. Setton farms Pistachio bites use all US grown nuts. The mini bite is 20g and has 110 calories, making it a quick pick me up. The best part is the cartoon pistachio bar on the packaging.

New Flavors of Old Favorites

Clif Organic Trail Mix Bar: The super company is rolling out their take on the Kind Bar—a gluten free whole nut bar, minus the weird chicory crisps. Unlike competitors, all the ingredients are organic and there are big fatty chunks of chocolate. Clif attempted a bar similar to this and has renamed it to the Organic Trail Mix Bar line. Their new flavor at OR 2015 was Dark Chocolate Cherry Almond.

Health Warrior Chia Protein bar: the company known for slow release energy bars is rolling out a new Protein line. It has 10 g of vegan protein (quinoa, pea protein, and almonds) per 1.76 oz bar. Flavors are Dark Chocolate Coconut Sea Salt, Peanut Butter Cacao, Honey almond, and Lemon Goldenberry

 

Watch out for the last food write-up from Outdoor Retailer 2015!

Bacon, Jerky, and Meat: Big Food Trends at Outdoor Retailer 2015

This is Part 1 of the Food and Nutrition trend articles from Outdoor Retailer 2015. It is Part 2 in the Outdoor Retailer 2015 Summer series.

Paleo Bars and Jerky

It seemed like there was a new meat product around every corner of the Outdoor Retailer Summer 2015 trade show. With what seems like half the young population in Colorado going Paleo (the other half is the increasingly less trendy but much better for the environment vegan), the market–as exemplified by the health and energy foods that show up at OR– has stepped up to offer fresh, fun flavors.

What this means for hikers is that we don’t have to be stuck with Slim Jims and Walmart Jerky for our backpacking trips anymore and that the market is expanding far away from the fruit-and-nut bar we’ve all eaten a million times. It also means there are more savory bars on the market (check out my series on savory bars). A bunch of these meat bars can also be used as dinner alternatives for the stoveless or dinner supplements for the stoved.

Wild Zora bars combine organic veggies and natural meats to create a paleo bar. Each package is 1 oz, 120 calories.
Wild Zora bars combine organic veggies and natural meats to create a paleo bar. Each package is 1 oz, 120 calories.

Wild Zora:

The first meat and veggie bar on the market, Wild Zora uses grass-fed beef, local lamb, and free-range turkey to create moist creatively flavored bars. The bars have no nuts, gluten, soy, grains, MSG, chemical additives, or sugar or sweetners and run under the motto that “fruits and nuts do not make a complete meal” (those two ingredients, of course, being the contents of most of the bars at the Show). Wild Zora bars are 1/3 organic veggies, making one bar a full serving of veggies. This can be useful to hikers to help up our veggie intake. Zora Bars come in Chili Cayenne Apricot Beef, Parmesan Tomato Basil, BBQ Hickory Tomato, Turkey Masala Spinach, and Lamb Rosemary Spinach. My favorites were the lamb (which was among the moistest bars on the market) and the Parmesan Tomato (a really unique flavor for a meat bar.

Fusion jerky mixes tender Asian-style jerky with funky Western flavors.
Fusion jerky mixes tender Asian-style jerky with funky Western flavors.

Fusion Jerky:

A mix between Asian-style jerky tenderness and America-style jerky flavors, Fusion Jerky offers meat-eaters funky flavors and new animals to jerky. Fusion Jerky is the first jerky line to offer chicken jerky. They also offer some intriguing flavors including Garlic Jalapeno Pork Jerky, Rosemary Citrus Turkey Jerky, and Basil Citrus Beef Jerky. The only jerky company to be owned by a woman of color (she’s Asian and came up with the idea while hiking Kilimanjaro, so of course I have a soft spot for her), the company uses only US animals and is MSG and nitrate free. Her family has been in the jerky business for 50 years and makes their jerky in Nebraska.

Brick bars mix grass fed meat and nuts to make a milk/gluten/soy/grain free bar. 130 calories and 11 g of protein in 1.5 oz.
Brick bars mix grass fed meat and nuts to make a milk/gluten/soy/grain free bar. 130 calories and 11 g of protein in 1.5 oz.

Bricks Bars:

A new Paleo bar out of Brooklyn, Bricks Bars combines grassfed, antibiotic-free meats, veggies, fruits, and seeds to create a moist and richly flavored bar. Flavors come in Grassfed beef/uncured bacon/cranberry/sunflower seed AND Turkey/sweet potato/cranberry/pumpkin seed. These brand new bars blew my mind in the taste test and I look forward to seeing the company progress as they develop new flavors and grow.


Duke’s Small Batch Smoked Meats:

This Boulder Colorado-based jerky company has their own smoke house and crafts everything in batches of 500 pounds or less. Duke’s prides itself on less sugar, only hardwood smoked (not liquid smoked), and only US raised meat. There are three varieties 1) slow smoked thin cut jerky 2) extra thick and tender strips 3) and slow dried old world style sausages (kind of like a high class version of the Slim Jim). They features fun flavors like Bourbon Beef Steak Strips (made with actual Jim Beam), Chile N Lime Beef Strips, and Stubb’s BBQ braised pork strips

Epic bars are coming out with new flavors and new meat products
Epic bars are coming out with new flavors and new meat products

Epic Bars:

I’ve written about the Epic meat bars before on this blog, so was excited to see that they are rolling our 3 new flavors: the uncured bacon bar, the Chicken sesame BBQ bar, the Pulled Pork Pineapple Bar, the Beef Apple Uncured Bacon Bar, the Chicken Sriracha bar and (get ready for it) the Liver beef and sea salt bar. The company is also rolling out a new line called Hunt and Harvest Mix which includes jerky, berries, fruits, nuts, cacao nibs, and coconut chips to create a sweet and savory trail mix. This is the trail mix meant to appeal to the Hunter and Gatherer Paleo types. Epic also has come out with Bites—mini bars essentially—that are a portion-control re-sealable snack (whatever that means). These come in new flavors: bison/bacon/raisin/chia, beef/cranberry/sriracha, bacon, and chicken/currant/sesame.

The next section of the Outdoor Retailer Food and Nutrition Write-up will focus on intriguing options for the stoveless, new caffeine delivery systems, how to eat crickets on the trail, and how to drink less water. That and more…next time!

Backpacking nutrition: fat, fat, fat

Carefully choosing and my backpacking food. Admittedly, it looks like my rations at the end of this 7 day trip were down to nothing but Probar wrappers.  Photo by Grant Sible.
Carefully choosing and my backpacking food. Admittedly, it looks like my rations at the end of this 7 day trip were down to nothing but Probar wrappers.  Photo by Grant Sible.

This Spring, I’ve been experimenting with foods and nutritional science to improve on-trail diet and help me carry less food weight during my backpacking trips. The justification for this was simple: A better diet means less food to get the nutrition I need, meaning less weight carried on my back, which means being able to walk further.

I’ve noticed on hikes that a diet loaded in sugar (hiker favorites include Poptarts and Snickers) can lead to crashing (aka “hitting the wall,” “bonking,” and “pooping out”). I usually burn through high sugar energy after an hour and then am hungry again, even if I just downed 500 calories! As a result, I end up needing to eat more and eat more often—and thus carry more food.

Not the healthiest fat being consumed here on the CDT
Not the healthiest fat being consumed here on the CDT

While there’s lots of info on the Internet about fat loss associated with long slow distance exercise (aptly named LSD)—essentially what thru-hiking is—it’s a bit harder to find info about eating fat. In fact, googling long slow distance just results in a lot of Crossfitters hating on LSD and calling it boring (Guess what? I think what they do is boring compared to thru-hiking).

Birds, whales, and pretty much every other animal relies on stored fat to go on migrations—again, essentially what thru-hiking is. It turns out that not just stored fats, but also high fat diets may improve endurance in long slow distance activities.

Eating Wild Friends almond butter straight from the jar at snacks break. This is the first time I ever used my new Toaks long titanium spoon. I can finally reach the bottom of the jar!
Eating Wild Friends almond butter straight from the jar at snacks break. This is the first time I ever used my new Toaks long titanium spoon. I can finally reach the bottom of the jar!

Like all things, nutrition on trail requires a balance. Some marathoners recommend balancing your diet with 50% carbohydrates 30% fat, and 20% protein. But frankly, a lot of hikers walk farther than marathoners, and we certainly do it slower. In fact, our goals are different than most runners; we’re not trying to beat times, lose fat, or even build muscle. We’re out there to have a good time, see some nature, and not feel like garbage while we’re doing it. Since our goals, speed, and distances are different than marathoners, our nutrition should be slightly differed, too. At least one nutritionist suggests that for thru-hikers to meet our goals, the hiking diet should contain 35%-40% fat.

The best suggestion I’ve found anywhere is that thru-hikers should eat foods that our stomachs can actually hold down. Getting food—any food—to your stomach is better than having a pack full of all the “right stuff” and not eating it (that, or puking it up—that’s bad too).

Along those lines, while nuts and seeds are considered a thru-hiker staple, I’ve been eating the same boring fatty foods for enough seasons that downing this “typical hiker fare” feels like the proverbial “eating my vegetables”—I do it because it’s good for me, not because I like it.

Sometimes, the best way to get your fat is to cook a mid-day lunch. Somewhere between Salida and Twin Lakes on the Colorado Trail
Sometimes, the best way to get your fat is to cook a mid-day lunch. Somewhere between Salida and Twin Lakes on the Colorado Trail

Recently, I’ve been experimenting with a few high fat foods that take a twist that proms them up and makes them amazingly delicious. Like, I keep coming back for them delicious and can’t wait to have more. Sure, there’s a little sugar in these, but not anything near the usual hiker favorites—Little Debbies, Homerun Pies, or even many bars.

These food items pack out easily, have a great calorie to ounce ratio, and taste awesome enough that I can’t wait to down my daily fat:

Navitas Organic Coconut Chips

I took this on a dayhike where I was just starving all the way to the top of the mountain. In fact, I’d been starving when I started. I had one 2 oz bag to share between two people. Amazingly, the fat—or something—in these chips made me feel immediately full and satiated afterwards. That would’ve never worked with 1 oz (ok, maybe I ate more than my fair share…) of any food I’ve hiked with before. Future plans involve carrying nothing but these coconut chips to trick my thru-hiking body into fullness.

 

 Olomomo Nut Company

For people like me who are highly food motivated, sometimes food serves more than just fuel for a hiker’s body, but also for a hiker’s inquisitiveness.With flavors like Maple Masala Kettle Roasted Pecans and Cinnamon Cayenne Almonds, these nuts are never boring. I first discovered these at OR last year, and horde them whenever I find them on sale. They’re definitely pricier than the usual roasted nut, but come in such intriguing flavors that they never sit at the bottom of my pack and actually become a huge incentive that has gotten me through some big climbs. I wasn’t sure what a Mango Chipotle almond tasted like, but my curiosity got me pushing over the next bump.

Wild Friends Nut Butters

As a person who is allergic to peanuts and hazelnuts, it’s really hard to find nut butters that come in anything but plain or creamy. Once again, the crazy flavors are a winner for me, from the Breakfast of Champions Vanilla Espresso Almond Butter to the Maple Sunflower Butter. The butter comes in plastic jars (a must for backpacking) and they are also available in single serving squeeze packs for dayhikes or backpackers who enjoy the easy clean up. There’s pretty awesome peanut butter flavors like Honey Pretzel Peanut Butter or Cinnamon Raisin for those who can eat them without dying.

Navitas Organic Coconut Hemp Pepitas

I’ve taken this tasty standby on two urban thru-hikes in areas where I knew the only food I would find would be fast, fried, and disgusting. I wanted instead to carry a food in my urban hiking pack that would be tasty and fatty enough that I’d be able to say “no” to the temptation of the abundant town food nearby, but also something a heck of a lot more nutritious. I can’t say I enjoy hemp seeds or pepitas raw—I’ve just eaten waaaay too many of them. I don’t know what Navitas did to these seeds, but it took a lot of resistance not to eat the entire pack in one sitting. Delicious—and at 170 calories per ounce, it makes a perfect trail food, even when you’re not walking right through town.

Avocado Oil
This carries more calories per ounce than the hiker-favorite, olive oil, while also having a subtler taste. I’ve met numerous thru-hikers who’ve downed so much olive oil that they gag at the sight of it in a hiker box. Avocado oil mixes well with breakfast drinks like the hiker favorite Carnation Instant Breakfast without making it taste like dinner.

How to Train your Feet for Hiking Season

Altra Zero Drop shoes have quickly become a hiker favorite.
Altra Zero Drop shoes have quickly become a hiker favorite.

If you’ve ever thought about switching to Altra Zero Drop trail running shoes for your backpacking season, now is the time to start getting your foot accustomed to the shoe. I find that switching to hiking in the Altra Lone Peaks has increased my stability, reduced my strike impact, provided comfort for hours of hiking, eliminated long term hiker issues like plantar fasciitis, and increased my efficiency. That being said, hitting the trail with a brand new pair of Altras if you’ve never worn them before may not be the best idea because there is a transition time associated with switching over to a Zero drop shoe.

Lone Peak 1.0 in Escalante. Photo by <a title="Rocky Mountain Ruck" href="www.barefootjake.com">Barefoot Jake Morrison.</a>
Lone Peak 1.0 in Escalante. Photo by Barefoot Jake Morrison.

Fear not, though—the benefits of switching over are HUGE for long distance hikers. Zero drop shoes help align the feet, reduce the impact of each foot step, and increase your stability. The foot shaped toe box—increases balance and efficiency, while reducing blisters and chaffing, maximize shock absorption and allows toes to spread out naturally. What this means for hikers is day-long comfort, increased stride efficiency, and less foot pain.

Baileys traverse in the Lone Peak 1.5s. Photo by <a href="www.barefootjake.com">Barefoot Jake.</a>
Baileys traverse in the Lone Peak 1.5s. Photo by Barefoot Jake.

So, why should you start transitioning to Altra shoes now instead of say, a few days before my hike most thru-hikers (myself included) do the bulk of the trip planning? Because we’ve all spent years wearing high-heel like elevated trail runners, our feet have been trained to be lazy (in scientific speak—has neutralized our Achilles and lower calf muscles). If you hit the trail doing 15s, 20s, or 30 milers in a zero drop shoe when you’ve never worn zero drop shoes before, your Achilles and lower calf muscles are going to feel the burn. The muscles in your feet are going to be confused. It’s best to give yourself at least three weeks to strengthen your legs and feet before your hike.

Bobcat, Malto, and me on the Wonderland Trail in the Lone Peak 1.5s. Photo by Swami at <a href="www.thehikinglife.com">the Hiking Life.</a>
Bobcat, Malto, and me on the Wonderland Trail in the Lone Peak 1.5s. Photo by Swami at the Hiking Life.

Pre-hike training schedule:

Before you get your shoes (or during week 1): Walk around barefoot in the grass or the beach or your bedroom for 30 seconds, adding a 30 seconds per day. Week 1: Wear Altras around the office and running light errands (they sell a “work appropriate” show called the Instinct Everyday that has many of the same features as the running shoe, but looks like it’d work with a suit). At first, the Toe Shaped footbox may feel too roomy and weird. After a few days, your toes will start relaxing and will start spreading out naturally.

Sandstone in Moab in the Superior 2.0s Photo by the <a href="http://therealhikingviking.com/">Tom Gathman.</a>
Sandstone in Moab in the Superior 2.0s Photo by the Tom Gathman.

Week 2: Do a very short hikes (whatever that means to you). Start without your backpack and give yourself a rest day to assess how your feet, joints, Achilles, foot muscles, and lower calves feel. If everything seems great, slowly increase the mileage and add weight to your backpack, being sure to build in days in between for rest and recovery. On a thru-hike, it’s near impossible to take zero days every day, so let your body take advantage of rest days between hikes to build muscles and strength. Let your body also take advantage of the muscle building fuels that you can get from living off trail. Building muscles on trail when you’re living on instant mashed potatoes and ramen is going to be a little bit more difficult.

Escalante in the Lone Peak 1.5s. Photo by<a href="www.barefootjake.com">Barefoot Jake</a>
Escalante in the Lone Peak 1.5s. Photo byBarefoot Jake

Barefoot Jake. Week 3: Up your mileage slightly, being sure to take days off in between. Take note of any excessive soreness or discomfort and rest up more. Week 4-6: Do a few hikes of the approximate length that you would wish to start a thru-hike. Take some days off between. Assess how you feel. Try doing that distance with a full pack of gear.

Glacier walking in the Lone Peak 1.5s in Olympic National Park. Photo by <a href="www.barefootjake.com">Barefoot Jake.</a>
Glacier walking in the Lone Peak 1.5s in Olympic National Park. Photo by Barefoot Jake.

With this training system, your feet will get stronger and reduce the chance of getting bone fractures. Your lower calves will be ready to hit the trail (relatively speaking). And you’ll enjoy the natural alignment benefits of wearing a Zero Drop shoes. Wearing Zero Drop shoes is like long distance hiking: once you start doing it, you’ll have a hard time thinking of life the same way. If you’ve ever thought about it, I highly encourage starting now before hiking season gets into full swing so that you can maximize the benefits when you’re on trail.     (P.S. I’m not a doctor. Legal says that you should consult with your physician before doing anything physical or changing your life in any way).

Savory Bar Review: Gardenbar Mexican Savory

This is part of a multi-part series reviewing the State of the Hiker Food Market highlighting the new trend of savory food bars. To see other savory bar reviews, check out the savory bar series.

With Brian  Davidson (trail name: Mr. Gorbachev), we took the Garden Bar Savory Mexican bar on our section-hike of the PCT in Washington.

Details:

Weight: 1.76 oz (45g) Calories: 190 Protein: 5 g.

Interesting notes: High in Vitamin C and Iron, does not contain any of the 8 major allergens. Vegan, gluten-free, soy-free, and GMO-free.

Ingredients I’m intrigued by: teff flakes, quinoa crisps, amaranth flakes, dried crimini mushrooms, freeze dried olives (did not know this was possible!), yellow corn chips (in a bar? Interesting…) black bean flakes (also interesting in a bar)

Price: $1 a piece, so definitely on the reasonable size. Note this is the price Gardenbar charged at PCT Days , so retailers may increase the price.

Overall thoughts: Mr. G really enjoyed the flavor, but these tasted too much like normal hiker dinner (dehydrated black beans) for me to be really excited about it. If I want black beans and corn chips, I’ll eat my dehydrated dinner with Fritos.

Where to get: Gardenbar website, coops and grocery stores in the Pacific Northwest including (but not limited to) Portland, Ashland, Cascade Locks (right on the PCT), Corvallis, Eugene, Vancouver, and randomly . . . my home in Denver.

Gardenbar flavors tested
Gardenbar flavors tested

 

Disclaimer: We purchased these bars with our own money and have no relation or contact with the company.

Everything you need to know about Women’s Hiking Issues

The Trail Show’s Women’s Issues episode is now out–featuring 50,000 miles worth of female-powered experience
The Trail Show’s Women’s Issues episode is now out–featuring 50,000 miles worth of female-powered experience

Whether you’re a hiker, hiker to-be, or friend or family of a hiker, there’s no more fun place to get all the information you need than from the people at the Trail Show. TTS is a podcast that’s been around for over two years with a well-respected repository of all news, tips, and tricks related to hiking.

After numerous requests, TTS finally put together a women’s issue show, the Red Tent Show (yeah, they really did call it that). Instead of the usual hosts, the Red Tent show utilizes the wisdom of 5 accomplished female long distance hikers with more than 50,000 miles of experience. I was lucky enough to be part of that crew (along with Angelhair, Trainwreck, Salamander, and our host, Princess of Darkness) so can give you a sneak peak at some of the topics we covered:

-Safety on Trail

-Women’s Outdoor Gear

-Women’s Hygiene (including dealing with “that” time of the month while on trail and sex in the woods)

– How Men can act better on trail

-Could birth control lead to hiking injuries?

Even though I’ve been hiking-while-woman for 29 years now, I honestly can say I learned a lot of tricks and tips from talking with these other accomplished lady-hikers.

I went into the Red Tent show expecting that we would all have the same advice, and was blown away by how different hikers have developed different ways of addressing the same issues.

To learn more, download the Red Tent show from the Trail Show.

 

The women’s issues specialists